Human Resources SWOT Analysis

Goal – identify Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) in Human Capital practices. An HR SWOT analysis involves identifying issues and finding solutions before they become unmanageable. View the SWOT analysis as an assessment of what the organization is doing right, how things might be done differently, more efficiently, or at reduced costs, and what must be addressed immediately.

S: HR strengths include strategy and functionality, building a top-tier workforce, being an employer of choice.

W: Weaknesses may stem from budget constraints, employee morale, high turnover.

O: Opportunities could come from workforce growth, demand for products and services, translating to higher wages, growth for surrounding communities, longer tenure.

T: Offering better working conditions, higher wages, more desirable benefits by others, cause difficulty recruiting best-qualified people.

HR SWOT ANALYSIS STARTING POINTS – OVERVIEW:

  1. Talent Management
  2. Performance management / Disciplinary issues
  3. Recruiting / Talent Acquisition
  4. Compensation
  5. Personnel Policies
  6. HRIS practices
  7. Payroll System / Time-keeping
  8. Employee Benefits
  9. New-employee orientation
  10. Training and Development
  11. Compliance
  12. Government Contractor conformity

HR SWOT ANALYSIS – DRILLING IN:

  1. Talent Management
    1. Ensure thorough understanding of company strategies, objectives
    2. Review competitive landscape, current, and potential business challenges
    3. A-Player vs. D-Player talent; ensure rankings in-line with business model
    4. 360-feedback
    5. Cultural realities
  1. Performance management
    1. Disciplinary issues; what, handling of
    2. Performance Reviews
    3. Terminations; policies and actions
    4. Employee Relations
    5. Employee Satisfaction
    6. Legal charges, complaints, resolutions
    7. Conflict Resolution
    8. Handling of Absences, Tardiness
  1. Recruiting / Talent Acquisition procedures
    1. Interviewing process
    2. Interview training
    3. Job Descriptions
    4. Background screening, Pre-Employment assessments
    5. Hiring processes; Forms & Tools
    6. Online / Social presence
    7. Recruiters vs. Agencies
    8. ATS system
  1. Compensation
    1. Salary adjustments; frequency, reasoning, fairness
    2. Base-pay increases
    3. Short-term incentives
    4. Discretionary awards, spot bonuses
    5. Long-term incentives
    6. Commissions
    7. Benchmarking
    8. 401(k) / other Retirement options
  1. Personnel Policies
    1. Performance and Discipline
    2. PTO, Holidays
    3. Absence without notice; Tardiness and call-in
    4. IT usage / Social 
  1. HRIS (must have data to make decisions)
    1. Current vs. needed
    2. Existing reports, Reports required
      1. Headcount
      2. Retention / Turnover
        1. Staffing needs, future pipelines
        2. Recruiting timelines / Time to fill
        3. Open Positions / # unfilled and why
        4. Effectiveness of Source
        5. Promotions / Internal moves
        6. Terminations / Reasons
        7. Absences, tardiness
        8. Age, Zip code, other Demographic breakouts
        9. Employee Survey input and follow-up
  1. Payroll System / Time-keeping practices
    1. Automation vs. manual
    2. Rounding up
    3. Corrections
    4. Dates
  1. Employee Benefits
    1. Medical
    2. Dental, Vision, STD, LTD, Life
    3. Fringe benefits per employee feedback
    4. Costs vs./ Value
  1. New-employee orientation forms
    1. Offer letter
    2. First day
    3. First 90 days; Expectations / Goals
    4. Provide feedback quickly
    5. Recognize achievements early
    6. Day-180, Day-365
  1. Training and Development
    1. Safety / Security / Workplace Violence
    2. Non-Harassment / Non-Discrimination
    3. Certified Interviewer
    4. Tracking and Reporting
  1. Compliance
    1. FLSA Classifications; Contract Employees
    2. Healthcare Reform (ACA), tracking, 2015 reports
    3. FMLA, ADAA, and other Leave requirements
    4. Employee Handbook
    5. EEOC requests for information
    6. Personnel files
    7. HIPPA
    8. I-9 & E-Verify
    9. Inspection and evaluation of physical facilities
    10. Workers’’ Compensation policies and practices
    11. Posters
  1. Government Contractor Compliance
    1. Affirmative Action Plan
    2. EEO-1
    3. EEOC Classifications
    4. Minimum wages
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Wellness Programs Challenged by EEOC

Watch Out – the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is Heading Toward your wallet; they File Lawsuits Challenging the Voluntary Nature of Wellness Incentive Programs.

Background

In the past three months, a regional office of the EEOC has filed three lawsuits against companies in relation to their wellness programs for perceived violations of the ADA and GINA. To date, despite pressure from many groups, the EEOC has not given definition to the amount considered voluntary, which creates ambiguity.

The positioning of the incentive as a penalty was also a factor in all three cases.

Key Impacts

It is critical that a wellness incentive program is voluntary. The structure and positioning of the wellness incentive program should be positive and not a penalty or surcharge.

Until the EEOC provides guidance, it will be difficult to understand what amount constitutes voluntary. However, ACA guidelines defined an allowable maximum of 50% of the total premium for programs targeting tobacco use. So, that number can be used as a guide for what is acceptable across all incentives. Note that the risk reduces as the amount reduces.

We’ll be watching this. I’ll provide updates when available.

SL

Thanks to Andy Carr, Health Management Services Product Leader, The Oswald Companies, and Andrea Esselstein, J.D., The Oswald Companies, for their original article.

The Future Is Now!!

 You may remember the Saturday morning cartoon, The Jetsons.  They had flying cars, wrist watches that doubled as phones, and video-based communications; we do not have the flying cars yet, but we do have wrist watch-based phones, and we have videophones.  And those videophones are set to take over the job hunting interviewing process.

 

About 25% of companies are taking advantage of Skype and what it has to offer.  The most obvious usefulness is how well prepared and/or serious a candidate will be when doing this interview. Get familiar with the technical aspects of Skype – use it with family or friends a few times so that you will be prepared when (not “if”) you are asked to be a part of a Skype interview.  Ensure you are not constantly looking down toward your monitor, but instead, like a TV reporter is taught to do; look at the camera, and think of it as the “eyes of your interviewer.” 

 A couple more Skype etiquette tips:

  • Even though you will most likely be doing your Skype interview from home, be sure to look your best!  Use the same professional dress code you would follow for an in-person interview. 
  • Avoid distractions:
    • Turn off other computer programs
    • Turn off your cell phone
    • Close doors to avoid children, pets, or other interruptions.
  • Ask for a contact number once you have logged in; in case any technical challenges arise, you’ll be able to call them back. 
  • Ask the interviewer if they can see and hear you well, before the ‘official’ start of the interview, so you can make any needed adjustments. 

Good luck with your job search, and have fun with your Video interview!